COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Clinical Topics in Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP401
Instructor(s): Mark Kuczewski, PhD; Katherine Wasson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an overview of the major areas of clinical biomedical ethics. Participants will gain familiarity with the terminology, resources, and major frameworks of ethical analysis in biomedical ethics. Issues that will be examined and analyzed include problem-solving methods, the theory and practice of informed consent, end-of-life decision making, physician-assisted suicide, pediatric ethical dilemmas, spirituality in clinical encounters, the injustice of health care disparities, and the role of ethics committees. Extensive use of case discussion and analysis will help to develop the participants’ ethical problem-solving skills.
*MA, Certificate program requirement

Justice and Health Care (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP402
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD; Chalmers Clark, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an overview of justice and health care with a special emphasis upon the developing world. We will read from a variety of sources to better understand what justice means generally and what justice means with regard to health care. Readings will come from the following books: Pathologies of Power by Paul Farmer, The End of Poverty by Jeffrey Sachs, Medicine and Social Justice by Rhodes, Battin and Silvers, Medicine and the Market by Callahan and Wasunna, Health and Social Justice by Jennifer Prah Ruger.  We will examine prevailing theoretical frameworks and examine how justice is played out in various health care systems.
*MA program requirement, Certificate program - optional 2nd course requirement

Ethics Across the Care Continuum (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP403
Instructor(s): Mark Kuczewski, PhD; Patrick McCruden, D.Bioethics, MTS
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will prepare students to identify biomedical ethical issues in a setting such as long-term care, rehabilitation care, psychiatric care, dentistry, and alternative medicine and to develop moral frameworks for addressing these issues.  These objectives will be met by considering the current literature on ethical issues in these settings, analyzing cases and issues from these health-care delivery sites, and exploring theoretical questions concerning how the principles and frameworks of biomedical ethics can be adapted to apply in these settings.

Biomedical Ethics and the Law (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP404
Instructor(s): Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course serves as an introduction to biomedical ethics and the law. Traditionally, the law has had a significant influence upon the development of bioethics; more recently bioethics has been shaping legal decisions and legislation. After a brief historical introduction to bioethics and the US legal system, we will survey a number of seminal legal cases. These cases touch upon areas such as reproduction, end of life care, the doctor-patient relationship, standards of care, new technologies and death and transplantation. We will also regularly refer to various codes of medical ethics.  Being a seminar, this course will be discussion-based. At times, lectures, guest speakers and video vignettes will be used throughout the duration of the course. Supplementary reading will be required in addition to the main text we will use. Students will also be expected to present cases during the course and briefly present their papers at the end of the course.
*MA program requirement, Certificate program - optional 2nd course requirement

Research Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP405
Instructor(s): Emily Anderson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This interactive seminar will explore the responsible conduct of science with a focus on ethical issues in clinical research involving human participants. We will review federal research policies related to investigator responsibilities and institutional review board (IRB) function. Students will become familiar with the history, terminology, and resources of research ethics as well as key debates that have occurred/are occurring in the research ethics literature. Material covered in this course will be relevant for clinical investigators, IRB members, and ethicists.

Principles of Health Care Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP406
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD, Chalmers Clark, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an overview of important ethical theories in bioethics. We will mainly examine major works in the field by leading bioethics scholars to become better familiar with different approaches in the field. At the end of this course, participants should be able to: Identify and analyze the ethical theories that undergird contemporary bioethics, become familiar with various theoretical approaches by leading bioethics scholars in the field, and learn to critically examine these approaches through weekly discussions and writing assignments. Click here for course introduction video on YouTube.
*MA program requirement, Certificate program - optional 2nd course requirement

Social Science and Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP407
Instructor(s): Lena Hatchett, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will review the theoretical work on social science (anthropology, sociology) and moral reasoning as it pertains to the discipline of bioethics, its philosophical roots, and the body of social science work in bioethics. This class will critically examine a number of current bioethical issues in the United States and internationally. The course considers how both bioethical dilemmas, and the values, principles, rights, etc. that serve as their foundation, are shaped by patients' and health professionals' cultural values and beliefs about concepts of self/personhood, body, life, and death. This course will also explore how broader, socio-cultural factors relating to power, economics, gender, science, and the media influence bioethical dilemmas and their resolution. Students will learn how to use the technique of self-reflexivity to understand cultural values. Click here for course introduction video on YouTube.

Ethics, Genetics & Health Policy (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP408
Instructor(s): Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an introduction to genetic ethics and a survey of topics that constitute the professional and popular literature in the field. Topics to be considered include, but are not limited to, gene patenting, human cloning, and race and genetics. Classes will be topic driven and will draw upon a variety of sources including a recent genetic ethics text and an anthology of articles on various topics within the field. The ethical questions that genetic technological advance poses to our understanding of human identity and social justice will serve as the organizing themes of the course.

Religion & Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP409
Instructor(s): Michael McCarthy, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is a thematic exploration of religion and bioethics with a specific concentration on its implications at the end of life. The course will consist of three parts. The first-third of our course will consider the current state of the question of the control exercised through the medicalization of the dying process. Life expectancy over the last century has increased exponentially, and within recent decades the ability to pro-long one’s life through the use of medical technologies has shifted the role of health care at the end of life. The second part of the course considers whether various religious traditions offer an alternative approach to understanding suffering and death, and how it might inform bioethical considerations at the end of life. The final component of the course, will allow for an in-depth exploration of Christian practices at the end of life. This is a reading intensive course aimed to assist students in establishing familiarity with scholarly reflection on some of the larger questions of suffering and death, and meaning that underlie these issues in bioethics and the practice of healthcare at the end of life.

Ethics Consultation Seminar (3credits)
Course Number: BEHP410
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD; Katherine Wasson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION 
This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a three-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL). This seminar is for everyone who sits on an ethics committee and wants to do consults but doesn’t feel qualified, and everyone who has been doing them for years but wonders whether they could be doing better. Finally, a chance to practice doing consults! This course employs our faculty and professional “standardized patients,” as well as our extensive videotaping and technological capabilities at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Illinois, to simulate ethics consultations, practice communication and interaction skills, and provide constructive feedback to the seminar participants.

Public Health Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP411
Instructor(s): Lena Hatchett, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course introduces current ethical issues in public health research, practice, and policy. We will use public health frameworks and approaches to explore prevention, social justice, and health equity, including food environments, international public health, community-based participatory approaches and health care reform. At the end of the course you will be familiar with key readings, ethical frameworks, and practical tools for assessing public health challenges.

Organizational Ethics I: Business, Professionalism, and Justice (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP412
Course Prerequisites: None
Instructor(s): Mark Kuczewski, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a two-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL). This course examines ethical issues in health care from the vantage point of decision makers who shape the system, e.g., physicians within a group practice, administrators within a health system, or advocates within a community. In particular, issues of balancing fidelity to the mission of a health-care organization with limitations emanating from its operating or profit margin will be considered in detail. The social and economic context of health care in the United States will be overviewed as the background for considering the responsibilities social justice entails to self, one's profession, the various institutions of which a healthcare profession is a member, one's patients, and the underserved.

Organizational Ethics II: Ethical Leadership for a Changing Healthcare Environment (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP419
Course Prerequisites: None
Instructor(s): Mark Kuczewski, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a two-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL). This course examines the theory, role, and elements of leadership that effectively serve non-profit healthcare systems. In particular, the nature of leadership is examined. Questions of leadership style and theories of what constitutes effective leadership are considered. Communication strategies and methods of organizational change key focuses. The combination of the online and on campus environments represent an opportunity for heightened interaction and a rich learning experience that taps many resources not easily available in either environment.

History of Medicine & Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP413
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, PhD; Chalmers Clark, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course seeks to situate and examine the emergence and development of the field of bioethics within the history of medicine and the ethical concerns embodied in medicine’s practice. The opening weeks of the course will provide an overview of the history of medicine. The remainder of the course will examine how bioethics emerged within this broader history of medicine and continues today as a distinct discipline. The course will be anchored by several history texts and supplemented with primary source materials to further examine key documents, persons, and events in the field of bioethics.

Moral Theology for Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP414
Instructor(s): Michael McCarthy, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course seeks to offer a substantive introduction to Christian ethics with particular focus on its application to bioethics. The course has two foci. First, it will offer a historical survey of the development and progression of Christian ethics from the ancient Greeks and biblical times to the 21st century. Second it will consider the Christian vision of what it means to be a person and how that vision shapes an approach to bioethical reasoning through a consideration of themes including creation in God’s image, the gift of human freedom, the relationship of the body to the soul, sin, grace, the mystery of death, and the hope of bodily resurrection. Readings will range across the Christian traditions, Protestant and Catholic alike, with attention paid to similarity and divergence in these approaches. No prior theological training or faith commitment is presumed as this course is designed as an introduction to the field and its pertinence to bioethics. 

Catholic Bioethics in Clinical Practice (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP415
Instructor(s): Michael McCarthy, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers a topical survey of bioethical issues pertinent to clinical practice in the Catholic context. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' document, Ethical and Religious directives for Catholic Health Care Services, 5th Edition, serves as the guiding document of the course. Topics and concepts considered include abortion, contraception, sterilization, nutrition and hydration, withdrawal of life support, care of the dying, cooperation, conscience, human dignity and personhood. This course aims to assist students in establishing a substantive familiarity with the positions and moral reasoning of the Catholic tradition in clinical bioethics through a consideration of Church documents, scholarly texts and articles and formative debates within contemporary Catholic bioethics.

Catholic Bioethics and Social Justice (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP416
Instructor(s): Michael McCarthy, PhD; Therese Lysaught, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course involves an historical study of the development of the body of official Catholic Social Teaching (CST) specific to its impact on healthcare delivery in the United States.  Current developments in select key social issues and movements are also addressed insofar as those issues and movements influenced healthcare delivery. The pastoral letters of the U.S. Bishops, especially their teachings on healthcare reform, also receive attention.  The interface between religious faith and public policy debates is a constant concern throughout the course.  Practical strategies for fostering a social justice consciousness in healthcare settings are also considered.  Extensive use of case discussion and analysis will help to develop the participants’ understanding of the principles of CST and their application to the healthcare context.

Narrative Bioethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP417
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a two-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL). This course will consider a major theoretical framework in bioethics that has emerged as a serious alternative to principle-based bioethics. In this course, students will gain an understanding of what narrative bioethics is, read theoretical texts related to narrative ethics, and also read a variety of narratives that relate to medicine and health care (stories, films, etc). The role of narrative in the ethics consultation process will also be explored. This course aims to equip students with a sophisticated understanding of narrative and the role it plays in medicine and bioethics.

Advancing Health Equity Practice (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP418
Instructor(s): Lena Hatchett, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a two-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL).  This course will introduce the frameworks and practice health equity as it pertains to the field of bioethics. The tools and materials help students more effectively incorporate health equity into all aspects of their work. Topics include community health, multisector community engagement, and innovative approaches to clinical and community work to improve population health.

Bioethics, Biotechnology, and the Law (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP420
Instructor(s): Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Advances in biotechnology and the life sciences are reshaping when life begins, how life is lived and when life ends. Developments such as the ventilator, in vitro fertilization, organ transplantation, gene therapy, stem cell therapies, and e-health technologies challenge long held perceptions of the intersection of law, medicine and society.  These weighty challenges exemplify the reactive nature of law and the role that ethical dilemmas, and at times, ethical disputes play in establishing law and policy in a very diverse and pluralistic society. This class will explore the historical relationship between law and bioethics and examine how law and bioethics come together or may be at odds in resolving the many dilemmas raised by biotechnology.  Issues such as the changing nature of the physician-patient relationship, the continuing evolution of informed consent, the intersection of commerce and science, the changing definition of death, the growing complexity of reproduction, and societal notions of privacy will all be discussed.

Integrating Empirical Research in Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP425
Instructor(s): Emily Anderson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an overview of empirical research in the increasingly interdisciplinary field of bioethics. We will examine the relationship between empirical data and normative claims and the potential pitfalls that may arise when using information about what “is” to determine what “ought” to be done. Students will gain familiarity with the range of quantitative and qualitative research methods commonly used in bioethics as well as the academic disciplines and theories on which those methods draw. We will review recent empirical studies in bioethics and critique choice of methods, presentation of data, and interpretation/application of findings to conclusions and recommendations. This course will examine empirical studies on ethical problems in medicine, public health policy, and clinical research. Discussions will be relevant to a range of professional settings.

Ignatian Spirituality and Medicine (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP 426
Instructor(s): Michael McCarthy, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course in will explore the roots of Ignatian Spirituality as presented in the Spiritual Exercises and implications that these themes have in health care. The Spiritual Exercises, written by St. Ignatius Loyola, develop through four movements. These movements, or weeks, can both form and inform personal and institutional practices. Themes that will be explored focus on: the limitation of humanity, freedom and sin, discernment and discipleship, suffering and compassion, mission and hospitality. The course will explore these themes through various readings on Ignatian Spirituality and an invitation to incorporate some of these practices into your own life. After the course, students should have a substantive understanding of Ignatian spirituality and ideas about its implication in the practice of health care. 

Professionalism & Professional Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP427
Instructor(s): Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD; Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will review and critically examine the professional codes of ethics of a variety of health-related professions: medicine, nursing, dentistry, social work, chaplaincy, risk management, and allied health. We will examine the growth of professionalism as a movement and ask a number of questions related to this topic: What is a profession? What are professional ethics? Is there a difference between common morality and professional ethics? Is there a difference between applied ethics and professional ethics?  We will also discuss whether a pan-professional ethics code is needed for the health care professions.

Writing and Scholarship Skills (3 credits)
Course Number BEHP 428
Instructor: Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
In an online program, writing skills are an essential form of communication not only between the instructor and students but also among and between the students themselves.  Moreover, a requirement of the Master’s and Doctoral programs is a scholarly writing project. Therefore, developing writing skills is an essential component of the Bioethics Program. This course will provide a review of basic writing skills as well help students develop analytical and communication skills that are critical to scholarly writing in the multidisciplinary field of bioethics. The topics covered will include: Academic Integrity; Grammar; Resource Development/Citation; Clarity/Formality; Development of a Thesis and Writing of a Thesis Statement; Organization and Outlining; Critical Thinking/ Analysis/Reasoning; and Development of a Conclusion.

Pediatric Ethics  (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP 429
Instructor: D. Micah Hester, PhD; Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will introduce ethical topics in the areas of pediatric medicine and research.  Although many tools of ethical reflection and deliberation have no relationship to the age of the population being considered, there are aspects of the pediatric population that raise unique concerns, create novel moral environments, and thus require nuanced and sensitive attention to and tools of ethical inquiry.  Children are not just adults in smaller packaging, and while many of them develop physical and cognitive abilities that slowly become adult-like, not being “fully adult” (whatever we might mean by that) entails that we need to handle their care differently—medically, psychological, morally, legally, and so on.  Topics to be addressed may include—decision making, neonatal issues, teens and decisional authority, research with minors.

Advanced Clinical Ethics Skills (ACES) (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP430
Instructors: Katherine Wasson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is a two-month long blended course of online learning and a two-day intensive experience on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center (Maywood, IL).This blended course provides an opportunity for advanced graduate students to improve and refine their clinical ethics skills. The focus of this course will be for students to develop their own portfolios for quality attestation. Participants have an opportunity to practice consultation skills, evaluate the performance of others and receive feedback from faculty reviewers in our clinical skills center. 
Course Prerequisite: Ethics Consultation Simulation Course

Advanced Topics in Research Ethics: Special Populations (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP431
Instructor: Emily Anderson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will focus on the unique issues that arise in research with special populations. These include but are not limited to children; women, fetuses, and embryos; prisoners; indigenous and other racial/ethic minority communities; and healthy volunteers. Research in emergency and international settings as well as research at the end-of-life will also be discussed. Material covered in this course will be relevant for ethicists, IRB members, and clinical investigators.
Course Prerequisite: Research Ethics

NEW COURSE! Mastering Clinical Ethics Consultation Skills (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP 491
Instructor: Katherine Wasson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This 2 week on-campus course provides an opportunity for advanced bioethics doctoral students in the clinical ethics concentration to refine their clinical ethics skills to a mastery level. Students will participate in simulated ethics consultations, practice communication and interpersonal skills and receive feedback on their performance.  With access to Loyola University Medical Center, students will participate in clinical rounds, case discussions, and active ethics consultations and debriefing sessions.  The Mastering Clinical Ethics Skills course will require students to reach a predefined mastery level of skill in simulated ethics case consultations using the Assessing Clinical Ethics Skills (ACES) evaluation tool.  They will also be required to write chart notes for ethics consultations. 
Course Prerequisites: Ethics Consultation Simulation Seminar, Assessing Clinical Ethics Skills

NEW COURSE! Oral Health Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP 491
Instructor: Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
According to the Centers for Disease Control, "Oral health affects our ability to speak, smile, eat, and show emotions. It also affects self-esteem, school performance, and attendance at work and school. Oral diseases - which range from cavities to gum disease to oral cancer - cause pain and disability for millions of Americans." As with other areas of healthcare, ethical issues arise in oral health. Issues to be addressed in this course will include access to care, confidentiality, professional obligations of dentists, informed consent, treatment planning, and the importance of oral health to overall health and well-being.

Practicum in Clinical/Research Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number BEHP421 (Doctoral Course)
Instructor(s): Clinical Ethics - Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD; Research Ethics - Emily Anderson, PhD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Clinical and research ethics are important areas of bioethics, and therefore concentration options in the bioethics doctoral program.
Students in the clinical ethics track are required to take this practicum course. The overarching objective of the practicum is to enable the student to work on a project which translates both general and discipline-specific information into clinical ethics practice. The student must demonstrate the capacity to utilize knowledge and make evidence-based decisions regarding clinical ethics issues, and exhibit leadership, creativity, and the ability to work well with others. The goal of the clinical ethics practicum is to provide students the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a clinical setting (e.g. community hospital or academic medical center), under the direction of a preceptor at that setting. The practicum also affords an opportunity to develop and apply certain competencies that tend not to be well developed in academic coursework. Here, students learn about how ethical issues arise at the bedside, and how to help facilitate ethical decision-making and resolution. This practicum will expose students to the practical applications of clinical ethics. Students will be required to identify an appropriate mentor who will precept the students during the course of a semester. A faculty member will provide feedback and guidance during the course of the semester. Students in the research ethics track may choose to complete a practicum as one of their 3 required courses. Students should work with Dr. Anderson to identify an appropriate policy or education project.
Click here for information for completion of Practicum, Exam and Capstone for Doctoral Degree.
Course Prerequisite: Clinical Track - Clinical Topics in Bioethics

Practicum in Organizational/Public Health Ethics (3 credits)
Course Number BEHP422 (Doctoral Course)
Instructor(s): Organizational Ethics - Mark Kuczewski, PhD; Public Health Ethics - Lena Hatchett, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Organizational and public health ethics are important areas of bioethics, and therefore concentration options in the bioethics doctoral program.  Students in the organizational ethics track are required to take this practicum course in mission leadership and organizational ethics. The overarching objective of the practicum is to enable the student to work on a project which translates both general and discipline-specific information into organizational ethics and mission practice. The student must demonstrate the capacity to utilize knowledge and make evidence-based decisions regarding organizational ethics/mission issues, and exhibit leadership, creativity, and the ability to work well with others. The goal of the mission leadership practicum is to provide students the opportunity to use knowledge and skills acquired in the academic program in a professional setting (e.g. community hospital or academic medical center), under the direction of a preceptor at that setting. The practicum also affords an opportunity to develop and apply certain competencies that tend not to be well developed in academic coursework. Here, students learn about how ethical issues arise at the organizational level and how mission leaders play a role in responding to ethical concerns and issues. This practicum will expose students to the practical applications of organizational ethics. Students will be required to identify an appropriate mentor who will precept the students during the course of a semester. A faculty member will provide feedback and guidance during the course of the semester. Students in the public health ethics track may choose to complete a practicum as one of their 3 required courses. Students should work with Dr. Hatchett to identify an appropriate policy or education project.
Click here for information for completion of Practicum, Exam and Capstone for Doctoral Degree.
Course Prerequisite: Organizational Ethics Track - Organizational Ethics I or Organizational Ethics II

Doctoral Capstone I (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP423
Instructor(s): Summer Johnson McGee, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an opportunity for doctoral students in our program to further develop a paper from their practicum experience and/or another course and revise it into a manuscript of publishable quality. The coordinator for this course, Dr. McGee, will serve as the faculty advisor to work with in reviewing the paper and providing critical feedback. In the first weeks of the course the student will identify a paper topic and the relevant journals in which the student may publish that paper. During the early part of this course, the student will revise and hone a thesis statement and write a first draft of the manuscript. After receiving feedback from the course coordinator the student will proceed to writing another draft of the manuscript. Finally, the student will revise the manuscript one last time, formatting it in the style of the journal identified, and submit it for a grade. The manuscript will also be submitted to the journal earlier identified.  Click here for information for completion of Practicum, Exam and Capstone for Doctoral Degree.
*Doctoral program requirement

Doctoral Capstone II (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP424
Instructor(s): Summer Johnson McGee, PhD
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is an opportunity for doctoral students to further develop a paper from their practicum experience and/or another course and revise it into a manuscript of publishable quality. This course builds upon Doctoral Capstone I (BEHP 423). The coordinator for this course, Dr. McGee, will serve as the faculty advisor to work with students in reviewing papers and providing critical feedback. In the first weeks of the course students will identify their paper topic and the relevant journals targeted for submission. During the early part of this course, students will hone a thesis statement and submit a draft of the manuscript. After receiving feedback from the course coordinator students will submit another draft of the manuscript. Finally, the student will revise the manuscript one last time, formatting it in the style of the journal submitted to, and submit it for a grade. The manuscript will also be submitted to the journal earlier identified. Click here for information for completion of Practicum, Exam and Capstone for Doctoral Degree.
*Doctoral program requirement

Master's Research Capstone (3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP492
Instructor(s): Nanette Elster, JD, MPH
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This capstone course provides an opportunity for the student to develop a conceptual or empirical research project under the direction of a mentor. The project culminates in production of a short manuscript suitable for peer review by an appropriate journal.
*MA program requirement

Independent Study (variable, 1 - 3 credits)
Course Number: BEHP493
Instructor(s): Neiswanger Faculty